Motorcycle riding is a favorite pastime and a mode of transportation for many Americans, but even though it can be fun, it can also be very dangerous. A clear day and open roads, in Washington, may be very tempting for motorcycle riders and may seem safe, but there are still chances of a crash happening every time you get on the road. Of course, there are basic precautions that riders take to stay safe, but there are many dangers on and off the road that are out of motorcycle riders’ control. Here I will cover some of the reasons motorcycle crashes happen and what you can do to avoid them.

Main Causes of Motorcycle Crashes

Be Watchful of Cars Turning Left

One of motorcyclists’ biggest threats is one that is almost out of their control. A motorcycle rider can be driving safely while wearing all of the necessary safety gear and still be involved in this type of motorcycle crash. This is especially concerning since this type of accident accounts for 42% of accidents involving motorcycles and cars, with motorcycle deaths being nearly 30 times more common than drivers of other vehicles. The best way to avoid this motorcycle accident would be to anticipate the driver’s next move by watching for indicators like the car driver waiting to turn and the driver looking both ways. Still, it might be hard for a car driver to spot you at times so keep your head on a swivel for any drivers that might forget to yield the right of way.

Watch Your Speed and Sharp Turns

Motorcycles can also go faster than most cars, which is a purchasing point for some riders out there. It is best for motorcyclists to be wary of their own speed while riding, because motorcyclist error is a more common contributing factor to accidents involving a single vehicle. The chances increase if the motorcycle they’re riding is more sporty and has an increased speed. Obviously, the best way to avoid any accidents from speeding is to go the speed limit and watch for any other motorcyclists that are speeding. Some turns can be pretty tricky for motorcyclists with the room for error being much larger than it would be in a car. If a motorcyclist loses traction on a turn, whether that be through a patch of sand, gravel, or water, it could result in a bad injury for the rider. The motorcycle rider could also misjudge the tightness of a turn and cause them to take the turn too fast. The best way to avoid a